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A MINIMALIST’S GUIDE to LIVING a MINDFUL LIFE
  • 08/11















    Venice Rattan Chair
    Hattie Table Lamp
    Carlyle Shams
    Parkwood Swivel Chair
    Fairfield Pillow Cover

    The way most minimalists approach color—specially the ones who jumped on the bandwagon as the minimalism fever was starting is a bit limited and we all know that. And even though that contrary to what many believe, black, white and beige are colors, I can also support that we need to stop being so afraid of all the other colors in the wheel.

    My constant urge to always question everything that looks "ruly" convinced me very early that there wasn't a point in simplifying, cutting down and making everything functional if that deprived me or anyone else of the joy that life brings and even if you are adept to the thinking that colors that veer from the old black and white (maybe some grey in there) isn't minimalism, you surely can agree that different strokes for different folks and that there is an inherit sense of joy that some colors bring to people's life and it would be pointless to remove that just for the sake of minimalism.

    If you, reading this feel daunted by the task of adding more color into your life / interiors and are holding back from fear that you will regret painting that wall or buying that set of blue sheets (that would be me) or maybe you just want to finally get some artwork on your walls let me tell you this: You won't regret doing something that will lift up your mood and that gives you a sense of new possibilities.

    The way to introduce color into a minimalist home is "slowly" and also mindfully:

    1. Don't tackle a big change but small changes and stick to the values of one in-one out so that you don't end up accumulating unnecessary things
    2. Add pops of color first; a vase, a pillow or maybe a nice coffee mug to replace that dodgy old white one with coffee stains stuck at the bottom—we've all had one of those, os is that just me?
    3. Stick to a palette by making two colors the base—let's say beige and black (let's give harsh whites a little rest)—and work around that adding complimentary pops of color like desaturated blues, earthy greens or muted yellows, whatever tickles your fancy but in a way it makes sense for you in your minimalist life
    4. If you're not ready to paint the walls add texture to it or a nice piece of minimal art
    5. If all of the mentioned above still scares you, bring in nature, whether a new plant or maybe flowers in a color you never got — and on that, I have to confess I spent years getting white flowers and clearly missing out. So bring in the hydrangeas, the daisies, the sunflowers — you name it

    Personally, I've never had anything against color but it just didn't make sense in my life before. Now I enjoy a beautiful beige surrounding with big pops of black, blues and greens and is it just me or does that dining room seem incredibly inviting, fun and nostalgic for some reason, all that the same time?

    © jake curtis
  • 07/29















    Berkeley Accent Chair
    Cultiver Linen Bedding
    Micah Round Mini Serving bowl
    Regina Andrew Dayton Table Lamp
    Lunch Wall Art by Hobday
    So, turns out you're not a fan of maximalism and you're also not happy with the inflexible white and black minimalist aesthetics. Well, perhaps this Danish home designed by the one and only Norm Architects will tickle your fancy? — I think yes and hear me out.

    The Vigi House, which is a reformed 60's home, sits on a sloping plot in Virum with high ceilings, light tunnels and open spaces. This home was intended blend in with it's natural surroundings and be a comfortable-minimal family home for its owners and that it does.

    I don't know about you but one of my (maybe unhealthy) stress comping mechanisms is to vicariously pack my bags and move into wonderful houses like this one, were it looks peaceful, not stifling and quite — then I'm snapped back into reality by my neighbours drilling the walls for the 4th time this week and I thank the technology gods for the Internet.

    Although we can only enjoy the Vigi House vicariously we need to admit, it's quiet perfectly planned for a family sanctuary. As always, Norm Architects delivers pure architectural goodness.

    © Norm Architects
  • 07/26



    Today the term 'minimalism' is at the heart of conversations about sustainability, design, philosophy and mindfulness. And while maximalism continues to make its way back into people's homes, it's a new kind of maximalism—one less about buying more and more about design: more color, more shapes, more contrast.

    Warm minimalist design sits in the middle of both extremes. It is not deprived of any color, shape or texture, but it's also not a very out-there or (personally) overwhelming style—and don't get me wrong, there's nothing wrong with some "kapow"... but warm minimal is where I currently exist and so is my current obsession.

    Brands like Menu have equipped the design-conscious minimalist for years now but Menu has truly been a pioneer when it comes to minimal, responsible and durable design and it has long been delivering beautifully crafted furniture, lighting and interior accessories shaped by purposeful details, high-quality products—and now sustainable ones too.

    Their newest products carry through their minimalism philosophy while also bringing sustainability and a sense of warmth, calm and comfort to any space and we see it in the raw fabrics, textures, naked woods and organically-structured shapes—creating spaces that make you feel like you're in a welcoming home rather than a white room or a playhouse.

















    Hashira Floor Lamp
    Brasilia Lounge Chair
    Walnut Bottle Grinders
    Gravel Rug
    Gray Yana Brewing Pot

    “How do you create a warm minimalist room?”, you may ask? Easy:

    01. Warm Colors: Warm colors have an earthy quality to them, meaning that they are colors that can be commonly observed in nature; like the sea, vegetation, land, stones, the sky etc.—as opposed to plain white, which, yes, brings a lot of brightness to a room. These colors help you bring in warmth. But I’m not just talking about your walls, I mean decor items, furniture and everything that comprises a room.

    02. Rich Textures: 'Touch' is one of the qualities we overlook the most when it comes to decorating our homes—and this is what brings that sense of "homeliness" to a home. Consider adding natural elements to a room, textured fabrics, naked wood and rugs.

    03. Mix Old and New: The combination of modern and vintage has always been a winner, so don't be afraid to bring in a family relic or think that it won't fit your minimalist principles ... because it will! Sustainability is at the heart of the minimalist philosophy, so whatever you can do to repurpose, all the better. Old furniture or decor pieces also usually have more character, which allows the decor to feel more interesting and unique.

    04. Think Comfort: Minimalism often feels stiff and uninviting, especially if we have the frame of mind that things just have to be functional. Things around us do need to be functional ... but also beautiful, significant and yes, comfortable. So, bring in softer sofas, mushy pillows, big throws, delicious bedding and soft rugs. Things that make you experience a sense of being embraced by them.

    05. Add Personal Touches: While minimalism used to be a little deprived of sentiment, now we understand that there are things we can still have in our homes because they simply bring us good memories and joy. Take out old photos and items you've collected from your travels and make them a part of the entire decor. This will undoubtedly infuse the room with more personality and uniqueness.

    Warm Minimalism is about being conscientious but not deprived. Is about understanding and applying the principles of Minimalism without feeling as if you're missing out. It's about choosing better, more durable, sustainable and enjoyable things and not just less for the sake of it.

    © Menu
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